Which Tree are You?

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields – Friday Fictioneers – 9th March

Which Tree are You?

crook-building

Photo by Sandra Crook

“Come tell me, Louise,” he said, pulling her from the water. “What happened to you?”
“Oh, Grandpa.” She laughed. “What a beautiful house, is it heaven?”
“For some. Such a dreadful war.”
‘Like you.”
“Yes. I was wounded at Sommesous. It broke her heart.” He ruffled Louise’s hair. “Ah, my Madam Lilly de Vogue and her hospital, our noble home.”
“My Grandma?”
“Yes. She saved many lives, but for every hero who died she planted a tree.”
“Is she here?”
“No, oh no.” He laughed.  “She lives with her lovers in Marseille. I wish her well.”
“Which tree are you?”
“My tree is the Colonel Marcel Pinion de Vogue.” He took her hand. “Now Louise, what happened to you?”
“I couldn’t swim, Grandpa.”

32 responses to “Which Tree are You?

  1. Fantabulous.. 😎🥀😎🥀😎🥀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Strange little tale. Why is Louise in the water in the first place?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I wondered if a backstory was needed (restricted word count, I’ve gone over by about 30 words). Lets just say, Louise was playing amongst the stones, while her parents were in the building. She fell into the water and Grandpa met her in the afterlife. Her parents will find her body, but her soul is with Grandpa. How’s that for a bit of back tracking?

      Like

  4. Delightfully different

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I really like the gentle tone of your story, and the sense of time and place- poignant past, lovely grand- pa and Louise. Well told.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. A charming ghostly tale, if there is an afterlife, I hope it’s like this.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Oh wonderful story!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A ghostly tale indeed. Looking forward to your 70 word story next week. (Rochelle keeps a tight control on credit at the work-bank.) 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Sandra, my goodness. I wasn’t aware of the penalty for overdoing it – generally in the past I have agonised over the word count. On this one I wanted to maintain the impact. I’ll have to prepare for the six word novel method.. Many thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Beautifully tragic. I loved it!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Lovely tale of the afterlife. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Wonderful story, James.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. A fabulous moment in time. I loved the memory.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. James! This is superb!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I love ghostly conversations..good one.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. lovely story. well done.

    Like

  16. I like that the dialogue jumps a bit, like in reality.
    Good story, pity about the word count.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. You’ve written a delightful ghost story, with cheerful, chatty ghosts. Perhaps it’s the beautiful location.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m a bit slow this morning. Figured it out the second time through, enjoyed it immensely.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. A ghostly reunion! Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. This was such a clever story. Beautifully done.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Oh wow. One of my favorites. I read it again to absorb the pleasure of your creativity again!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. This was a wonderful and cleverly written story. I love an afterlife like this, where you know your ways and meet the ones who passed before you.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. What a wonderful story. We often hope we meet with passed loved ones in heaven or where ever you believe you go and to read a conversation between grandpa and granddaughter was a delight. I don’t know that it mattered where she drowned although with the water there it could be assumed it happened there but the story of the hospital and the trees was lovely. So much in 100 words.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Ah, crud. Beautiful story. I love the historical facts and the symbolism, but the last line just broke my heart. At least, her Grandfather is there to greet her.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Fabulous bit of flash fiction James – the last line was simple and devastating.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. U really loved this – loved how it began with him asking what happened and ended the same with such meaning 😃

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Excellent microfiction!

    Liked by 1 person

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