Journey’s End Pub

This week’s picture, to me, is a reminder of the Burma -Death Railway built with forced labour by the Japanese Army during WW2. It is estimated that 90,000 labourers and 16000 allied prisoners of war died during it’s construction. The brutality of the period reverberates with us still, in books and in films.
One film, The Railway Man, is an adaptation of the account of a British Army Officer, Eric Lomax, captured and tortured by the Japanese. Years after the war Lomax confronts his Japanese counterpart and they become friends. As they say; time heals. Perhaps, but only for some.

My story has nothing to do with that tragic period.

Read the other stories on Friday Fictioneer by clicking here.

PHOTO PROMPT © Alicia Jamtaas

Journey’s End Pub

Their shift had ended 200 years ago, and the bearded miners packed the “Journey’s End” pub.
The flaming fire warmed the room, but at midnight the atmosphere turned sullen.

John sipped his ale.

Outside, a train screeching to a halt stirred all the men to drink up and leave.
John followed them into a fog of hissing steam that obscured a locomotive.
The miners climbed into the carriages, and the engine pulled away in the dark above dilapidated tracks.
John marvelled at this silver miners’ mystery.

He returned indoors to his bitter ale, and the crowded pub of bearded miners.

36 responses to “Journey’s End Pub

  1. Michael Humphris

    I enjoyed the imagery in this story.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Seems to me there was a sort of connection between your story and the prelude. Both, hopelessly sad, even tragic. Both, in which human lives are. disposable, throwaways. Good writing.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I’m a sucker for a ghost story that revolves around railways. Well done, very atmospheric.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. In my mind they all looked like those dwarves from The Lonely Mountain in The Hobbit. Good storytelling.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Oooooooo creepy ghost story. Nicely done

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Fascinating story. Thank you so much for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Something tells me they were better off in the pub than on the train. I don’t think there’s a way back.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I agree with all the comments above. I read the first line several times ~ I liked it that much. Delightful (can one say that about a ghost story?) ghost story. Well woven tale.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I love your two stories in one 😉
    Beautifully written, James.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. A beautifully structured story, evokes many story threads al woven together. A good story.

    Like

  11. This reminds me of the tales the village elders told whilst sitting around the log fire in the supposedly haunted pub I ran a few years back. Nice one James.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. I enjoyed the atmosphere of your ghostly tale. Well written, James. The introduction to your story is so very sad. Humans throughout history have shown themselves to be cruel. I’ve not seen the movie. I’ll look for it. Have a nice weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. The last train, indeed. Excellent story here. And, almost, in a way, it does reflect your preamble to the story. Loved it, however sad it is. Excellently woven.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I’m excited there are ghost pubs! A great opening line.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. it looks like they got hung up on the place and would be haunting it for eternity.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. “Their shift had ended 200 years ago” — what a brilliant opening to set up the story. Beautifully composed.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Was it a mine or train accident that killed them? Excellent atmosphere!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Dear James,

    Interesting, if not ghostly, pub customers. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Great first line. A real hook.

    Liked by 1 person

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