Village Hay and Bread

There is a sense of a peaceful country village in this week’s picture from Sandra.

A place where everyone knows each other and rumours and gossip flourish;
well, everyone wants to know all about you, especially if you have secrets to share.

More stories from Friday Fictioneers here.

Photo Prompt by Sandra Cook

Village Hay and Bread

Marcel drives his tractor through the village, although there are shorter ways to his farm. He stops at the Boulangerie, and it takes ages to collect his bread.

Across the street, Annette rearranges the books in the window of the Librairie, all the time watching for Marcel.

‘Stop it,’ Carole shouts from the till, and then joins her.

‘He’s taking his time.’ Annette checks her watch.

‘Mary-Anne is probably busy with a bun in the oven.’ Carole laughs.

‘Don’t! She’s happily married.’

‘And, she has loved both brothers.’

Marcel appeared; Annette waved.

‘Yesterday, Jacques bought a shotgun,’ said Carole.

‘No!’

35 responses to “Village Hay and Bread

  1. I like the slow pace of rural life you create, with the chatty gossip. Definitely trouble brewing I’d say.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Think a call to the local constabulatory might be a good idea for the sisters.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wonder if the local police issued the licence for the shotgun? Thanks for reading.

      Like

      • Did a quick check. Seems like even in the US, the sheriff’s office is involved. Didn’t dig deep enough to see how involved, and if there is a paper trail. Of course, that’s only if you buy the gun legally . . . and background checks, etc. are done. Shot guns, as they aren’t concealed weapons might be easier to slip through the system . . .

        Liked by 1 person

      • I cannot comment on the gun laws in the USA. I did meet a Air Force Reservist in Afghanistan who told me he had 15 Guns at home in his cellar. He was adamant that was normal where lived. Take care out there Lorraine.

        Like

      • Thanks. I learned a few years ago, after the police seized them, my senior citizen neighbour had 40 guns!!!!!!! Obviously, without any of the proper documentation. Even my landlady has a gun which she keeps in her place in Florida. Argh!

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Dear James,

    It sounds like Marcel might want to take an alternate route. 😉 Interesting bits of gossip. Nicely put together.

    Shalom

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  4. James,
    Seems making hay is a way of life here. Of course it looks like it may end with a bang. Nice twist.
    pax,
    dora

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh, this won’t end well… I love how you string us along, from a quiet scene of curiosity to one of temptation and then…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You set up your twist very neatly. I like the village setting you chose, and the way Carole tries to stop the prying, but succumbs to temptation quite quickly!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Oui, j’aime cet endroit peyton. (Yes, I like this Peyton Place.)

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A lot of story in a few words.

    Like

  9. YEp, that’s life in the “fishbowl” of small town to a tee.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Oh oh… I don’t think that’s a triangle that will end well.
    Ah small town life in a 100 words. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I think the quiet, idyllic country life is about to be turned on its head.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. everything was idyllic until the shotgun appeared. what a twist.

    Like

  13. Insightful and different take on the prompt. Well done. Loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Interesting one..I really want to know, who will be the target ?

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Good story, James!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Guess he got more than just bread!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. My bet is the target’s Mary Anne, not Marcel. Lovely slice of St Mary Mead life

    Liked by 1 person

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