The Curse of Calico Jack

Calico Jack was the nickname given to John Rackham, a pirate who stalked the Caribbean seas.

For this week’s Friday-Fictioneers, hosted by Rochelle, I have added my flavour in a mixture of fiction, myth and fact. So thank you Brenda for the engaging photo prompt, I can taste the fresh pineapple and feel the warm breeze.

More Friday Fictioneers’ tall tales, HERE.

PHOTO PROMPT © Brenda Cox

The Curse of Calico Jack

Grandma Louise sells pineapples and nutmeg from a shack, where she distils molasses rum. At sunset we swat mosquitoes, and sip from chipped glasses, as she laughs about her pirate ancestors. 

She knows the whereabouts on Barbados of a casket pilfered from Calico Jack by his lover, Anne Bonny. He cursed her to hell as he dangled in Port Royal, and she vanished like a silk scarf in a Caribbean storm.

Grandma won’t reveal where Anne’s ghostly soul lies and the fate of the Spanish plunder.

She just smiles, sipping rum, and nods to her pineapple fields and nutmeg trees.

42 responses to “The Curse of Calico Jack

  1. A tale within a tale, nicely done! Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear James,

    Love the atmosphere and characters you’ve created. Lovely read that left me wondering.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m betting if you dig up Grandma’s field ……

    Liked by 1 person

    • The best pirate gold stories can last for years. From my research most pirates squandered their share of the plunder and the idea of buried treasure is a myth. Well they have to say that don’t they.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. A nicely written tale unfolded as I read it.
    I think grandma may have a special fertilizer in the field.
    Nice take on the prompt. Have a good weekend …
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This took me back to the amazing time I had on a pirate ship in Barbados and drank so much rum punch that I didn’t remember getting off!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Fun story, James. Just a couple more ingredients to make fine piña coladas. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Aye, matey! And entertaining tale!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Skillful weaving of fact with fiction, and I enjoyed the ending very much. Vivid descriptors.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Nice description: “vanished like a silk scarf in a Caribbean storm”

    Liked by 1 person

  10. very clever getting such a sense of location in such a tiny word count. I could feel the warm breeze and smell the ocean.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. What Grandma Louise knows, stays with Grandma Louise.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Bags of atmosphere in this piece.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. hmm… it makes me wonder what grandma’s true identity is.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I expect she likes the grandkids always asking her about it so she can expand on her story 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Oh, I love this. You left us with a mystery only grandma knows and we can guess. Intriguing tale. Great line … she vanished like a silk scarf in a Caribbean storm.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. This is brilliant. Grandma Louise is a great character and the mood and details drew me right in. Love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Hmmmmm I wonder

    Terrific hint of mystery here, she knows far more than she’s telling!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. What a fantastic world. Leaves me wanting to know more.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Grandma knows a lot of secrets. Nicely done James

    Liked by 1 person

  20. A wise old owl is Grandma. Great story.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. What a great tale, atmospheric and lively. I bet grandma used the money to buy her land.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I think Grandma’s taking some secrets to her grave. She could tell, but that would be cheating. Her descendants need to keep that pirate spirit alive.

    Liked by 1 person

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