Tag Archives: Horror

Tempting Guacamole

Tempting Guacamole – 100 Word Wednesday.

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Dear Pips,

Please come back, I miss you, my darling Pips.
I’m sorry I was rude, about your lovely hips.
I love you and miss your gregarious smiles
I love you and forgive you for kissing Miles
Look, I’ve bought your favourite chilli tortilla chips
Because I know you love my guacamole dips.

Please come and trust me, my darling Pips
I’m sorry I was rude, about your lovely lips
I miss you, so let’s forget about you loving Jay
I miss you, see now, how my anger’s gone away
Look! I’ve spiced up your favourite tortilla chips
Because! I know you love my guacamole dips.

Waiting for the night

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Image by Bukurgurl

The Lighthouse (100 Word Wednesday)

Oh lonely, oh lonely was the lighthouse keeper.
and for ninety years he guided ships in this cove.
But now he haunts the night with a ghostly flicker.

In our Troubled World.

A cry for compassion.

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Peace struggles in pain

Throughout human endeavours

God’s indifference

Poetry – The Pantoum

In my quest to learn more about poetry I have attempted the Pantoum. This particular form, apparently, has its origins in Malay. As in many types of poetry there are specific rules or traditions to follow, which make them distinct, and therefore requires a careful attention when constructing the verses.

A traditional Pantoum has the following rules.

There is no specific length to the poem, therefore it can have as many verses as the writer wants.

Each stanza or verse has four lines.

The rhyming scheme is abab, bcbc, cdcd etc.

The second line of each verse becomes the first line of the next verse.

The fourth line of each verse also becomes the third line of the next verse.

The first line of the poem is also the last line.

Usually, although not fixed, the Pantoum has eight syllables in each line.

Because of the repetition of the lines, the poem is full of haunting echoes with the ending returning to the beginning. This form of poetry suits subjects such as obsession, searching and finding or comparing the past with the present.

My attempt is ‘The Wishing Well’.

Charing Cross Glasgow

Charing Cross Glasgow

 

The Wishing Well.

While walking by to work each day

I pass a dried up wishing well

Where people drop in coins to pray

They make a wish or cast a spell

 

I pass a dried up wishing well

Where they are building new homes

They made a wish or cast a spell

When they dug out the children’s bones

 

Where they are building up new homes

There are now pipes of fresh water

Where they dug out the children’s bones

The remains from a Dickensian era

 

There are now pipes of fresh water

And a dry well built of old stones

The remains from a Dickensian era

The brass plaque telling of the bones

 

And a dry well built of old stones

Where I stop for a moment to read

The brass plaque telling of the bones

And of a history I should heed

 

Where I stop for a moment to read

I drop a coin to wish and pray

And of a history I must heed

While walking by to work each day.

Innocent

My short story ‘Innocent’ is written in the second person, a difficult form of narrative to maintain with credibility.  The character is ‘you’, which I believe is a provocative gesture towards the reader. Many people are put off by this style as they find it difficult to form empathy with the character, especially if they are dark or evil. But this story is not about the character, it asks the reader to consider the meaning of ‘innocence.’ Are you convinced?